Solo project

Cecilia Brunson Projects in collaboration with Arts Connection are pleased to announce a solo presentation of new work by the Venezuelan artist Lucia Pizzani at ZonaMaco this February.

Transformation and metamorphosis are themes that recur continuously in Lucia Pizzani’s work. Working across a multitude of media (ceramics, photography, installation, performance and video) the artist interweaves historical narratives with the fundamental concepts of the body and gender.

In her new sculptural series, entitled Límbica¸ shown for the first time at ZONAMACO, the hard material of terracotta, itself loaded with cultural and historical references, is transformed into an organic, feminine form. In the same manner that the artist chooses to feminise the word limbic in the title of the series, she feminises the terracotta. The textured surfaces of the sculptures, whose pattern echoes the textures of skin, metamorphose her material, performing a type of gender alchemy. The title itself references the limbic brain. This is the part of the brain that governs emotions and basic impulses, such as sexual desire. This is the core of the body.

An accompanying series of photographs will be shown alongside these sculptures, again seen at ZONAMACO for the first time. Entitled Pieles (Skin), the images push this ambiguity further with the juxtaposition of the sculptures and the artist’s skin. The lines between the two become blurred and the sculptures, or vessels, become reincorporated into the body. Yet the contrast between the two materials is also crucial for the artist. While terracotta is a durable material, flesh and the body are not. The permanent nature of the sculptures stand in contrast to the impermanent nature of the body.

Límbica C (2017) Terracota sculpture on custom made base and mirror, 24x13x21 cm Unique

In the second series of photographs in this presentation entitled Sagrario (Sanctuary), the feminine vessel takes centre stage. Using the Nineteenth Century collodion process, the artist has made delicate images with the organic forms, both natural and made intertwining. The work is a hybrid of sculpture, performance and photography and, as with Him, engages with the idea of the chrysalis on a number of levels. The collodion works recall the style of Victorian portraiture and suggests women on the verge of emerging. Him, another collodion work, is a pivotal work in this presentation. . The work is a homage to Loie Fuller, an American artist born in the mid Nineteenth Century who was a pioneer of modern dance and theatrical lighting techniques and at the centre of Art Noveau in Paris. A self-portrait of the artist, with folds of material around her that echo Fuller’s imagery, it shows Pizzani at the centre of her work, empowered and emerging

 

Fotografía Ricardo Jiménez

 

This presentation is a collaboration with Arts Connection Foundation, Miami, USA.

Solo presentation of work by

LUCÍA PIZZANI

At ZONAMACO SUR

(Section curated by Kiki Mazzucchelli)

 

ZONAMACO MÉXICO ARTE CONTEMPORÁNEO,

MEXICO CITY 8 – 11 February 2018

Vernissage 7 February 2018

Further information on ZONAMACO MÉXICO ARTE CONTEMPORÁNEO: https://zonamaco.com

 

 

Lucia Pizzani, was born in Caracas, Venezuela, in 1975. She lives and works in London.

Pizzani has exhibited extensively internationally including Sala Mendoza, Caracas, Venezuela; Museo Jacobo Borges, Caracas, Venezuela; Galería de Arte Nacional Caracas Venezuela; Espacio Monitor, Caracas, Venezuela; Museo de Arte Contemporáneo MAC, Satiago de Chile; Photofusion, London; Art Exchange, Essex; Noorderlicht Photography, Groningen, Netherlands; Queens Museum, NYC; Exit Art (New York); MOLAA Museum Of Latin American Art, Los Angeles; Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Vigo, MARCO, Vigo, Spain and Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, among others.

Pizzani’s works are represented in private and public collections internationally, including ESCALA, the Essex Collection for Art from Latin America; Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, CPPC; Museum Of Latin American Art, MOLAA, Long Beach, USA; Colección Banco Mercantil, Caracas, Venezuela and Colección Juan Yarur, amongst others.